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Sleep Apnea Machines - Basic Information               

Although Sleep Apnea Machines may come from different manufacturers under different names,
they have a lot in common. Some of them are quite sophisticated, other have a rather simple 
design, but they may be equally effective in treating sleep apnea. The heart of each CPAP is 
a blower, or a pressure generator, that pumps the air you are breathing into the tubing and mask.

The simplest CPAP machine for sleep apnea will not have much more than the blower inside while more complicated machines may have more features and will be controlled by a computer.

The high end CPAPs, called smart or automatic, will keep track of your breathing pattern and adjust the pressure as needed during the night.

Another category of sleep apnea machines are bi-level CPAPs. They are delivering a higher pressure during inhalation and a lower pressure during exhalation. All of them are described below to help you understand what device may work best for you.

Today’s CPAP machines are unobtrusive, small, and quiet. In fact, the noise your CPAP makes may be more important to the person sharing your bedroom with you.

Today’s CPAP machines are unobtrusive, small, and quiet. In fact, the noise your CPAP makes may be more important to the person sharing your bedroom with you.

The user will hear mostly the sound of air flowing through the mask and leak vents and will likely have no difficulty falling asleep. To the other person the noise of the CPAP blower is what they hear the most. You can minimize that noise if you put the machine on the floor - it may lower the overall sound level quite a bit.

If you are not satisfied with your CPAP talk to your sleep specialist. They may be able to give you another CPAP of a different brand or a new mask. It is in your best interest to be satisfied with your equipment, otherwise you will join the group of former users.

If you are a CPAP user, check out some common problems reported with nasal continuous positive airway pressure and a trouble-shooting guide

The fact is, after 6 to 9 months only half of the patients will still use their CPAP machines for sleep apnea every night. The other half, for different reasons, put it aside completely or use it only occasionally, when they think they need it. This is unfortunate because as soon as you stop using your CPAP, apneas come back with full force and their damaging side effects.

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